Art & Artists in Exhibition: Vancouver 1890 - 1950
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Vancouver Sun November 6 1934

PASOVAS ART SHOW

MANY INTERESTING EXHIBITS AT CLUB DISPLAY

     Pioneer art students of the Vancouver Art School who form the membership of the Pasovas Club, are finding their feet in the world of art, and branching out along their own particular lines, it is shown in their fourth annual exhibition now on view at the Vancouver Art Gallery.
     Four years ago when the Club held its first show, it was distinctly a student affair, and the influence of the school was strongly marked. Today it is an artists' show.
     Though smaller than last year and not as varied in its contents, the exhibition is an interesting one.

WINNER EXHIBITS
     Vera O. Weatherbie, winner of the 1934 Beatrice Stone Medal, is showing "My-E-En," the painting of the Chinese fisherman which won her the award; and a group of small pictures in oils and water colors. The oils show more interest in color than this young artist has displayed in the past.
     Beatrice Lennie has two carvings, and several oils, as well as a pencil portrait study.
     Irene Hoffar Reid is representd with a number of striking paintings in the oils section, including a rather unusual study of "Autumn."
     Among the larger paintings on display is Frank (sic) Amess' "Woodland Temple," mural-like in style, and with unusually fine light-and-shadow effects.

ANIMAL SKETCHES
     Margaret Williams, Maud Shearman (sic), and Lilias Farley are well represented in the show, the latter both in the fine art and handicrafts sections. Apart from her original water colors, Miss Shearman shows some of her animal book illustrations.
     Exceptionally clever are Maisie Robertson's animal sketches. In her line drawings of a colt she has caught all of its awkwardness, in an amusing manner. Miss Robertson also shows several interesting animal carvings in wood.
     Jean Brown has only one contribution in the show, a nursery screen painted in oils, which tells the story of Baby Bunting and the daddy that went a hunting for rabbit skins.
     Very striking are Margaret Lynne (sic) Allen's polo pictures that have all the boldness of a poster.
     In the handicraft section this year Frances Gatewood has the field almost to herself. She is showing pottery and leather work, and has included two original sample tiles.
     The show will continue until November 18.



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